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Reign over your network with only a Kindle?

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Although any kind of advertisement is not the intent I am writing on these pages, the latest buzz motivated me too to drop a word on web powershell.

Have you ever thought about how to manage your network(s) laying languidly upon the beach, tanning and using the worldwide free Internet access? I have. Now I’ll be showing the facts and you the reader is the judge if it is possible to administer maximally remotely from a resort or not yet.

The check list of preparations is of three items (with exception of course sandals, towels and so forth):

  • a Kindle connected to a some network (Wi-Fi or GSM 3G is what is needed) from $114
  • a Mobile Shell box – from one 3G KIndle or two Wi-Fi special offer’s Kindles apiece
  • some scripts, especially changing security settings or touching the file system your boss’s host, to make the life breathtakingly sharper.

At first, buy and register a Kindle and download your copy of MobileShell here. While the latter can be downloaded on a monthly trial basis, the former needs defraying (you may try to use Amazon Return policy, though. If your test failed only). Go throught the text below if you have already checked all items above.

Install the software as said here (won’t you read the manual going to a beach?) and out, out to the beach. Any tests on a Kindle can be performed from there, for what else reason you sponsored the development of Pearl screens buying it?

Let’s connect to the MobileShell host. The only note here is that you need use strictly the mobile version by typing https://host_name_or_address/MobileShell/mobile , otherwise the Kindle bravely tries to swallow the desktop version, its browser got swollen and died until the device restarts.

After Kindle said you your rights, you are connected and may or may not see the choice if somebody knowing your login and password, you for example, was last night here:

We are leaving out the Favorites list

since we wanted to run a script or a piece of code. Probably unlike you, I forgot to write scripts and will run something useless. Meet the Kindle PowerShell Code Editor:

Of two colors, black and white, isn’t it? The very conservative design, easier than ‘vi’, though.

Some English IntelliSense helped us and our script is ready!

The first run is in a second, take a sip of what you drink on the sand and press the Run button!

Oops, the folder where I stored screenshots is where I’m sitting and I’m sitting not on the MobileShell host. But it would have found the folder if I’d written right, beyond the doubts.

Written by Alexander Petrovskiy

May 19, 2011 at 8:49 pm

WordPress PowerShell Code Coloring Test

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I have already written about how it’s possibly to post Powershell code here. As a year turned, why don’t check the state of affairs again?

My example is very simple and doesn’t cover all aspects of code. On the other hand, great sheets of code are not what is easily comparable with eyes.

1. This way my example is eyed in ISE:

Bugs are rare, however, it’s necessary to list them:

1.1 String data used without quotes is colored as a function (line 10)

1.2 Methods are not colored. It’s a typical trick, however, since nobody may know what it will be after the run of code. After having run the code, it’s considered here that no reason to re-color already colored code. (lines 10 and 42)

1.3 Property ‘Value’ is not colored (line 42).

Anyway, the coloring left the reader in a mood that all is healthy here.

2. Using Copy as HTML in PowerGUI 2.4 and Chrome 11, after adding manually line breaks (why doesn’t it type
s?), spaces and deleting trailing spaces after backticks (not in this sample), the following is workable:

cls
#region WordPress posting code test 
#this is a test of Powershell code coloring
[string]$stringVar1="string 1"
[string]$private:stringVar2='string 2'
[string]$script:stringVar3=
@' 
string data 
'@ 
[scriptblock]$global:sb= {{Write-Hostscriptblock}.Invoke();}; 
function 
write1{Write-Host $stringVar1;} 
function private:write2 
{param([string]$str2='')Write-Host $str2;} 
function script:write3 
#this is a function

Write-Host$script:stringVar3

function global:Print-SB 

<# 
.SYNOPSIS 
This is a code coloring test. 
.DESCRIPTION 
This test function represents an advanced Powershell function syntax. 
.PARAMETER 
Param Demonstrates how a scriptblock can be passed as a reference. 
.EXAMPLE 
PS C:\> Print-SB ([ref]$sb) 
#> 
[CmdletBinding()] 
param( [Parameter(Position=0, Mandatory=$true)] 
[ref]$Param 

Begin{} 
Process{$Param.Value.Invoke()} 
End{} 

write1 
private:write2 $private:stringVar2
script:write3 
Print-SB ([ref]$global:sb
#endregion WordPress posting code test

2.1 In the second code snippet we have numerous problems with names of functions, both where they are declared and where they are called.

2.2 Write-Host inside the second function

2.3 Such stuff like attributes in an advanced function.

To conclude this section, use the Copy as HTML option is a choice if manual editing doesn’t fatigue you.

3. WordPress provides a set of tags. Several parameters might do the life of a codeblogger simpler, especially 'highlight'.
cls
#region WordPress posting code test
#this is a test of Powershell code coloring
[string]$stringVar1 = "string 1";
[string]$private:stringVar2 = 'string 2';
[string]$script:stringVar3 =
@'
string data
'@
[scriptblock]$global:sb = {{Write-Host scriptblock}.Invoke();};
function
write1{Write-Host $stringVar1;}
function private:write2
{param([string]$str2 = '')Write-Host $str2;}
function script:write3
#this is a function
{

	Write-Host $script:stringVar3;
}
function global:Print-SB
{
<#
	.SYNOPSIS
		This is a code coloring test.

	.DESCRIPTION
		This test function represents an advanced Powershell function syntax.

	.PARAMETER  Param
		Demonstrates how a scriptblock can be passed as a reference.

	.EXAMPLE
		PS C:\> Print-SB ([ref]$sb)
#>
	[CmdletBinding()]
	param(
		  [Parameter(Position=0, Mandatory=$true)]
		  [ref]$Param
		  )
	Begin{}
	Process{$Param.Value.Invoke()}
	End{}
}
write1
private:write2 $private:stringVar2;
script:write3
Print-SB ([ref]$global:sb)
#endregion WordPress posting code test

However, the overall state is not appropriate, from my point of view. Yes, I know that the 'Frustration-Free' trademark is not WordPress's (as it is not Quest's too), but there is a room for improvement:

3.1 Variable names (lines 5, 6, 46, 48)
3.2 Function declarations and names (lines 11-13, 15, 21, 45-48)
3.3 A blob string (lines 7-9)
3.4 A specific to advanced functions comment-description (lines 23-35)
3.5 Types (lines 4-6, 10, 14)
3.6 Unquoted string (line 10)
I'll report these problems to Happiness engineers, maybe they share a bit of their happiness? 😉

Written by Alexander Petrovskiy

April 27, 2011 at 6:37 am

Posted in ISE, PowerGUI, Powershell, WordPress

Tagged with

An Infinitesimal Update To ObjectBrowser

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Hi, today’s update is really small.

– added a progress bar during the collecting Current AppDomain and GAC. This should do the GAC loading slightly less painful.

– the ability to be run from command line powershell as well as from ISE is now restored. Please use the following instruction to import the module:

Import-Module Add-on.PSDevStudioLite.ObjectBrowser -Force

Other changes relate to internal code structure and not to be seen right now in the GUI. As usual, the download location is here: http://www.box.net/shared/ot56ct7ngl

Which Icons Are Shipped With Object Browser?

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Actually, what is the easiest way to display icons? Create a control like ListView? Maybe. Let’s create a handful of windows, just to observe how short the code might be.

First, import both modules, SuiteCore and ObjectBrowser (here and thereafter the PSDevStudioLite modules set is in use).

After that you are able to use the function set shipped with the package. The following simple code creates windows, which in turn demostrate icons.

cls
function createWindows
{
    for($private:i = 0; $private:i -lt $imagesList.Count; $private:i++)
    {
        $tw2 = New-SEToolWindow -Control (([System.Windows.Forms.ListBox]$lb = New-Object System.Windows.Forms.ListBox) | %{$lb;}) `
            -TitleBarText ("aaa" + $private:i) `
            -WindowName ("aaaaa" + $private:i) `
            -Image $imagesList[$imagesList.Keys[$private:i]] `
            -Visible $false -State TabbedDocument;
        Write-Host $private:i $imagesList.Keys[$private:i]
        $se.ToolWindows[("aaaaa" + $private:i)].Visible = $true;
    }
}

createWindows;

In the GUI you might easily see all of them by clicking a triangle, allowing you to make a list of all open documents:

To clean up the document list is also simply, even somewhat simpler that to fill up:

function removeWindows
{
for($private:i = 0; $private:i -lt $imagesList.Count; $private:i++)
{
Remove-SEToolWindow -WindowName ("aaaaa" + $private:i);
}
}

removeWindows;

 

Requirements: PSDevStudioLite.SuiteCore 1.0.0.4 Beta and higher, PSDevStudioLite.ObjetBrowser 1.0.0.4 Beta ang higher.

http://www.box.net/shared/ot56ct7ngl

Note: all above are never be supported by quest, wasn’t and won’t be.

OB 1.0.0.3

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Object Browser 1.0.0.3 is uploaded to the link http://www.box.net/shared/ot56ct7ngl

This version comprises of two small improvements. The first one is a moving to be used in Strict mode. The second, and resulting the first one, is an improvement in showing private members.

Written by Alexander Petrovskiy

March 21, 2011 at 7:41 pm

OB 1.0.0.2

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As I languidly tested what was released recently as ObjectBrowser 1.0.0.1 July, 12th 2010, I remembered a couple of bugx I always wanted to fix. Today’s 1.0.0.2 shipped with

– search by name

– PleaseWait window

both fixed. As usual, the direct link is the same: ObjectBrowser

Written by Alexander Petrovskiy

March 18, 2011 at 7:49 pm

How to put your Powershell code onto WordPress page

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Supposing, you use the PowerGUI ScriptEditor. After writing a valuable fragment of code, you wanted to publish it in your WordPress blog. What would you do?

  • copy and Paste as Plain Text into your post?
  • copy and Paste from Word into your post?

Nope, the easiest way to do that is to

  • Save your code As an HTML page
  • open the page in any text or HTML editor of your choice
  • copy all from <pre> tag to </pre> inclusively (don’t bother about Tools -> Options -> Text Editor -> Tab; both states work)
  • activate ‘HTML’ tab in ‘Add New Post’ if you have ‘Visual’ one activated
  • paste to Edit Post frame.

Now this code in your blog is ready to be copied and pasted in Editors of your followers; it works immediately without any editing.

How to publish your code from Powershell ISE? Copy and paste it into a new document of PowerGUI ScriptEditor and just follow recipe above…

Written by Alexander Petrovskiy

July 5, 2010 at 6:49 pm

Posted in PowerGUI, Powershell, WordPress

Tagged with