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VisitorCounterBug2

Written by Alexander Petrovskiy

December 20, 2012 at 1:06 pm

Posted in WordPress

Tagged with ,

Visitor counter. The story 2

with one comment

How many visitors?

VisitorCounterBug

Hardly can two visitors be from four non-adjacent countries?

Written by Alexander Petrovskiy

December 19, 2012 at 12:40 pm

Posted in WordPress

Tagged with ,

WordPress added visitor counter to blog statistics

with one comment

The long-awaiting feature came to us: early we needed to use external map services not only to view visitors’ countries (it’s interesting, really), but also visitor counters as WordPress displayed only view counters.

Today I noticed that visitor counters are also seen in statistics:

VisitorCounter

There is nothing new in Summaries and the top view counter displays only views, however, this is a good little step to better usability, I believe.

 

Written by Alexander Petrovskiy

December 17, 2012 at 4:35 pm

Posted in WordPress

Tagged with

In response to the comment about using IsePack

with one comment

A recommendation for using PowerShellPack’s IsePack Copy-ColoredAsHtml has been made in the comment to my post. I’m not a big fan of this huge package, but this is worth testing for publishing.

I use the same code copy-pasted from an ISE tab:

cls
#region WordPress posting code test
#this is a test of Powershell code coloring
[string]$stringVar1 = "string 1";
[string]$private:stringVar2 = 'string 2';
[string]$script:stringVar3=
@'
string data
'@
[scriptblock]$global:sb = {{Write-Host scriptblock}.Invoke();};
function
write1{Write-Host $stringVar1;}
function private:write2
{param([string]$str2 = '')
Write-Host $str2;}
function script:write3
#this is a function
{
Write-Host $script:stringVar3;
}
function global:Print-SB
{
<#
.SYNOPSIS
This is a code coloring test.
.DESCRIPTION
This test function represents an advanced Powershell function syntax.

.PARAMETER Param
Demonstrates how a scriptblock can be passed as a reference.

.EXAMPLE
PS C:\> Print-SB ([ref]$sb)
#>
[CmdletBinding()]
param(
[Parameter(Position=0, Mandatory=$true)]
[ref]$Param
)
Begin{}
Process{$Param.Value.Invoke()}
End{}
}
write1
private:write2 $private:stringVar2;
script:write3
Print-SB ([ref]$global:sb)
#endregion WordPress posting code test

Below is the result of IsePack code preparation:

cls            
#region WordPress posting code test            
#this is a test of Powershell code coloring            
[string]$stringVar1 = "string 1";            
[string]$private:stringVar2 = 'string 2';            
[string]$script:stringVar3=            
@' string data '@            
[scriptblock]$global:sb = {{Write-Host scriptblock}.Invoke();};            
function            
write1{Write-Host $stringVar1;}            
function private:write2            
{param([string]$str2 = '')            
Write-Host $str2;}            
function script:write3            
#this is a function            
{            
Write-Host $script:stringVar3;            
}            
function global:Print-SB            
{            
 Print-SB ([ref]$sb) #>            
[CmdletBinding()]            
param(            
[Parameter(Position=0, Mandatory=$true)]            
[ref]$Param            
)            
Begin{}            
Process{$Param.Value.Invoke()}            
End{}            
}            
write1            
private:write2 $private:stringVar2;            
script:write3            
Print-SB ([ref]$global:sb)            
#endregion WordPress posting code test

This looks great and very similar to the hand-made colored code from my post. But who has stolen my advanced function’s comment?! ūüôā All the text between <# and C:\> inclusively erased as a cow licked out.

Written by Alexander Petrovskiy

May 5, 2011 at 6:30 pm

Posted in ISE, Powershell, WordPress

Tagged with

WordPress and PowerShell Code. The Second Try

with 4 comments

Last week I complained about how it is not easy to post Powershell code here. The letter of my dissatisfaction has been sent to and the answer was received from the WordPress support.

As a first step of our efforts to improve the code coloration was the question about what is wrong and what I’ve wanted. Of course, I assured the support specialist that I’ll provide so many examples of code that they will be able to polish publishing if they want to. That time the code sample appeared as on the following figure:

This post is the next step. I copy-pasted the WordPress code from my previous post on this topic to LibreOffice Writer 3.3, marked the most of significant blocks of code with several colors and put it back to WordPress page as an HTML.

Below is what I’d expect I might have had in my blog when I use the ‘sourcecode’ tag:

cls
#region WordPress posting code test
#this is a test of Powershell code coloring
[string]$stringVar1 = “string 1”;
[string]$private:stringVar2 = ‘string 2’;
[string]$script:stringVar3=
@’
string data
‘@
[scriptblock]$global:sb = {{Write-Host scriptblock}.Invoke();};
function
write1{Write-Host $stringVar1;}
function private:write2
{param([string]$str2 = )Write-Host $str2;}
function script:write3
#this is a function
{
Write-Host $script:stringVar3;
}
function global:Print-SB
{
<#
.SYNOPSIS
This is a code coloring test.

.DESCRIPTION
This test function represents an advanced Powershell function syntax.

.PARAMETER Param
Demonstrates how a scriptblock can be passed as a reference.

.EXAMPLE
PS C:\> Print-SB ([ref]$sb)
#>
[CmdletBinding()]
param(
[Parameter(Position=0, Mandatory=$true)]
[ref]$Param
)
Begin{}
Process{$Param.Value.Invoke()}
End{}
}
write1
private:write2 $private:stringVar2;
script:write3
Print-SB ([ref]$global:sb)
#endregion WordPress posting code test

I divided all the sample code into several meaningful groups. Although the exact color schema is a subject of possible further discussion, I used some, taken from both Powershell ISE and PowerGUI as an average. Here are groups instructions of the sample were split into.

1) the comments (green) group includes one-string comment beginning with the # sign and a multi-string comment applicable for advanced functions and consisting of all between <# and #> character sequences (sequences are included too).

2) commandlets and commands (some blue-gray color that has been used in the original WordPress’s coloration), and their aliases like Out-Null, Get-ChildItem, dir. There is a fixed list of them. Custom aliases and commandlets are not supposed to be colored due to the fact that WordPress doesn’t run any PS code and it’s completely unaware of new constructs.

3) data types and attributes (light-blue or green-blue) group constitutes of all the code in square parentheses but inner round parentheses.

4) the string data (brown) group is comprised of one-string declarations limited with single quotes or double quotes and a multi-string construction beginning with @’ and finishing at ‘@.

5) variable names (magenta) includes all unquoted string beginning with the $ sign and containing letters, numbers, underlines, question mark and colon. The dot is an end as well as the space.

6) specific words used within function declarations (bright blue). This groups the word function, and the function-related words param, begin, process, end inside curly brackets following the word function.

This color also can be used for statements like foreach, for, switch, if and so on.

7) function names (light lilac) of two types of occurrence: within the function declaration (that is, following the word function) and anywhere in the code. Function names usually contain letters, numbers and colons.

I hope that there is no need to repeat how lucky would be all WordPress Powershell bloggers if the WordPress developing team does the requested.

Written by Alexander Petrovskiy

April 30, 2011 at 5:25 pm

Posted in Powershell, WordPress

Tagged with

WordPress PowerShell Code Coloring Test

with one comment

I have already written about how it’s possibly to post Powershell code here. As a year turned, why don’t check the state of affairs again?

My example is very simple and doesn’t cover all aspects of code. On the other hand, great sheets of code are not what is easily comparable with eyes.

1. This way my example is eyed in ISE:

Bugs are rare, however, it’s necessary to list them:

1.1 String data used without quotes is colored as a function (line 10)

1.2 Methods are not colored. It’s a typical trick, however, since nobody may know what it will be after the run of code. After having run the code, it’s considered here that no reason to re-color already colored code. (lines 10 and 42)

1.3 Property ‘Value’ is not colored (line 42).

Anyway, the coloring left the reader in a mood that all is healthy here.

2. Using Copy as HTML in PowerGUI 2.4 and Chrome 11, after adding manually line breaks (why doesn’t it type
s?), spaces and deleting trailing spaces after backticks (not in this sample), the following is workable:

cls
#region WordPress posting code test 
#this is a test of Powershell code coloring
[string]$stringVar1="string 1"; 
[string]$private:stringVar2='string 2'; 
[string]$script:stringVar3=
@' 
string data 
'@ 
[scriptblock]$global:sb= {{Write-Hostscriptblock}.Invoke();}; 
function 
write1{Write-Host $stringVar1;} 
function private:write2 
{param([string]$str2='')Write-Host $str2;} 
function script:write3 
#this is a function
{ 
Write-Host$script:stringVar3; 
} 
function global:Print-SB 
{ 
<# 
.SYNOPSIS 
This is a code coloring test. 
.DESCRIPTION 
This test function represents an advanced Powershell function syntax. 
.PARAMETER 
Param Demonstrates how a scriptblock can be passed as a reference. 
.EXAMPLE 
PS C:\> Print-SB ([ref]$sb) 
#> 
[CmdletBinding()] 
param( [Parameter(Position=0, Mandatory=$true)] 
[ref]$Param 
) 
Begin{} 
Process{$Param.Value.Invoke()} 
End{} 
} 
write1 
private:write2 $private:stringVar2; 
script:write3 
Print-SB ([ref]$global:sb) 
#endregion WordPress posting code test

2.1 In the second code snippet we have numerous problems with names of functions, both where they are declared and where they are called.

2.2 Write-Host inside the second function

2.3 Such stuff like attributes in an advanced function.

To conclude this section, use the Copy as HTML option is a choice if manual editing doesn’t fatigue you.

3. WordPress provides a set of tags. Several parameters might do the life of a codeblogger simpler, especially 'highlight'.
cls
#region WordPress posting code test
#this is a test of Powershell code coloring
[string]$stringVar1 = "string 1";
[string]$private:stringVar2 = 'string 2';
[string]$script:stringVar3 =
@'
string data
'@
[scriptblock]$global:sb = {{Write-Host scriptblock}.Invoke();};
function
write1{Write-Host $stringVar1;}
function private:write2
{param([string]$str2 = '')Write-Host $str2;}
function script:write3
#this is a function
{

	Write-Host $script:stringVar3;
}
function global:Print-SB
{
<#
	.SYNOPSIS
		This is a code coloring test.

	.DESCRIPTION
		This test function represents an advanced Powershell function syntax.

	.PARAMETER  Param
		Demonstrates how a scriptblock can be passed as a reference.

	.EXAMPLE
		PS C:\> Print-SB ([ref]$sb)
#>
	[CmdletBinding()]
	param(
		  [Parameter(Position=0, Mandatory=$true)]
		  [ref]$Param
		  )
	Begin{}
	Process{$Param.Value.Invoke()}
	End{}
}
write1
private:write2 $private:stringVar2;
script:write3
Print-SB ([ref]$global:sb)
#endregion WordPress posting code test

However, the overall state is not appropriate, from my point of view. Yes, I know that the 'Frustration-Free' trademark is not WordPress's (as it is not Quest's too), but there is a room for improvement:

3.1 Variable names (lines 5, 6, 46, 48)
3.2 Function declarations and names (lines 11-13, 15, 21, 45-48)
3.3 A blob string (lines 7-9)
3.4 A specific to advanced functions comment-description (lines 23-35)
3.5 Types (lines 4-6, 10, 14)
3.6 Unquoted string (line 10)
I'll report these problems to Happiness engineers, maybe they share a bit of their happiness? ūüėČ

Written by Alexander Petrovskiy

April 27, 2011 at 6:37 am

Posted in ISE, PowerGUI, Powershell, WordPress

Tagged with

PowerShell-disabled Areas On The Globe

leave a comment »

A couple of weeks ago, I set the world-wide visitors widget (I love geography and maps). My blog is not a very popular place, being updated only from time to time, but the analysis is interesting.

From an independent point of view, examples of Winforms applications running in PowerShell should be equally interesting to people across the globe. However, it’s not so, far beyond from being so.

Let’s look at the coverage:

The US and Europe are undoubtedly global leaders. Western counties are the very center of PowerShell power, great and useful. Asia contributes too. Antipodes visit, but relatively rarely. The visitors are widespread across the US, whereas European ones are concentrated due to comparatively small sizes of their countries.

The most deserted areas like North Africa, Middle Asia, Western Australia and Greenland as well as South-American and African jungles are not supposed to hit the blog. The question here is Russia, with exception for Saint-Petersburg (my visits I suppose) it looks like a desert. Especially oddly does it seem like a Sahara in its European part. What may be the cause of this desertification effect? As I heard, some people in Moscow are aware of powershell advantages. Perhaps, the imperial tradition not to learn language but imperial one prevents guests from reading the blog? There is no answer, and never will be until Russian non-visitors explain such an evasion. ūüôā